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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
to cut costs and automate operations to compete with aggressive rivals in canada and south america. that is pitting them against unions, which are struggling to reserve high-paying jobs for the middle-class members. it was resolved late tuesday, according to this article. here is the front page of the press." feet frefree state says detroit out of time to fix its fiscal mess. falling revenues and rising expenses. the state of michigan delivered an abrupt ultimatum to the city wednesday. move quickly toward reform, or an emergency financial manager will be reported. -- a ppointed. -- appointed. dana in california, republican. caller: i'm 56 years old. i live in california. i can give the perspective of what has happened in my state and the economy and all that stuff. back in 1982, i was making $8.50 an hour. but i have seen happen in my state and happening in more, not just illegal immigrants, but our children. i have watched my state do a nose dive. people cannot afford more things. i'm watching them destroy our social system, our schools. it is absolute insanity, but i see happeni
should be worn in for a new six-year term in january. >> romo says this will move markets all over south america too. >> when you heard the announcement, a lot of people said it sounded like his good-bye. >> certainly did. >> 16 minutes past the hour. >>> extended look for our top stories, head to cnn.com/earlystart and twitter and facebook. search for early start cnn. >>> coming up this sunday on the next list, a successful arts studio, but he made his mark on the corporate world as cofounder of square. >> it allows small businesses to accept credit cards. his company worth billions. but he's still an artist at heart. >> art is what can't be proven mathematically, right? where science ends, the part that makes you feel good, but you don't know why. the way the object feels in your hand and looks, and if it's perfectly created, you can almost explain it to somebody else afterward. but in the creation part, you can't. you can see how glass is hon stantly moving. my job is to shape it. balance it at the same time. you can do that, you get these wonderful shapes. glass really rewards risk.
but starting today anyone with a phone in key emerging markets in india and south america and australia can sign up and it will roll out worldwide including here in the u.s. becky? >> julia, thank you very much. we'll be watching all that as it comes out later today. >>> let's talk consequences of the fiscal cliff. companies of announces dividends in recent days trying to avoid the tax hikes set to kick in at the end of the year. who is really making money on this? >> a lot of people especially ceos more than 110 companies have announced special dividends in the fourth quarter alone that's more than three times last year's fourth quarter. the reason? the fiscal cliff. if we go off the cliff tax rates on dividends could go from 15% to more than 43%. companies are racing to beat the tax hikes by paying dividends before december 31st and some of the biggest beneficiaries, both insiders and ceos. mickey arison is getting $89 million from carnival giving him a potential tax savings. and larry elison is getting savings around $56 million. thomas frist at hca is getting around $350 million, saving
or were in this country without proper documentation came from central and south america. the largest number of them from a single country, that is mexico. which is not altogether surprising when you realize we have a common border with mexico that ranges from the gulf of mexico to the pacific coast, it is approximately 1,960 miles long. and if you have visited, if you have traveled along the entire length, as i did back in the early 1980's as a member of the immigration subcommittee, you will find the topography sets that it is difficult at times to actually have a border that is marked and a border that is controlled. nonetheless, that does not excuse us for not exercising the control that we should have. because of the fact that we had this dilemma of a large number of people who had come to this country illegally, and at the same time we were attempting to enforce the law such that a worldwide quota system would still in fact be worked, in the 1980's, there was an effort to try to reform our immigration laws. i was a part of that, as a member of the immigration subcommittee. we we
the steps that will help delta grow in the future. you look at the alliances they're forming, gold in south america, and now with virgin atlantic. they're trying to position delta to have greater access globally for their business customers. that's the key here. >> yes. oil refining, they are thinking different, biphil for sure. phil lebeau in new york. willy walsh making a bet with richard branson that the virgin airlines brand will not be around in five years. branson offered to bet 1 million pounds, walsh reportedly said, i don't have a million pounds. a knee in the groin maybe. that's as painful to him as it might be to me. why can't our executives be that creative. >> that's so colorful. >> a ceo challenging another one like that in this country? >> it would be rare. >> it's rare. usually they control the company. that is typically -- they have large shareholders, they're never going to say something like that. >> they don't often mention body parts. >> only a guy could really appreciate that story. >>> cramer's live in washington. six stocks in 60 seconds. >>> if lawmakers do not agre
. when i first became the leader, i took a trip with a number of senators to south america to countries that we american senators had never been to, like bolivia. it was a wonderful trip. it was great for our country and it was good for the senators to learn more about that most important part of the world. i was very fixed on who i wanted to go on that trip with me. but the two i asked to go was judd greg going, new hampshire, who had been chairman of the budget committee; and kent conrad, who was chairman of the budget committee at the time. those two fine senators spent about 18 hours seated side by side, both having tablets to write on and they were working on the number-one issue that they thought was important for this country: what we do about the future of this country economically. and they came up with an idea that was very, very good. it had worked before on closing military bases. madam president, we had military bases that we had been trying to close since world war 1. we couldn't do it. we didn't have the political will to do it. so we had a base-closing commission. with t
on earth. best way to play it, kansas city southern. the new railroad running north/south across north america, or as they sometimes call themselves, the nafta railroad. at last, maybe we can get some revenge for all of the jobs nafta has caused us. all of the losses. anyway, ksu is my new favorite rail. and i think you can buy it at the weakest because it's got the tracks where people want them and little competition to boot. let's go to greg in mississippi, greg? >> yes, mr. cramer, thank you so much for taking my call. >> my pleasure. >> caller: i had the pleasure of speaking to you on the "lightning round" a couple of months ago about nordic tanker. >> yeah, go ahead, i'm sorry. >> caller: no, no, i'm sorry, at that time you recommended me not go into that particular stock. i was just wondering, you highly recommended it in your book getting back to even which i thoroughly enjoyed, and i was curious if anything changed in particular with the company or that sector in general. >> i had to back away from it. and i think those who know the show and watch it know that i've backed away
? i will talk about the bricks in a minute. i am talking about south america, eastern europe, parts of asia. why do i love this story? it is basic macroeconomics. the key ingredients that drive growth. we know the story of debt, deficit, fiscal cliff. we know that the story of the aging population and financing, if you look at the statistics are round or they measure the performance in mathematics, science, and reading, you can see where the problem is. today, they were in the number 27, 28, and so on. productivity generally is the x factor that accommodates for 60% of why one country grows and another does not. generally, it includes things like political dynamic, so we know what is happening there. that is not my prediction. look at this framework, capital, labor, productivity. you will see why i am incredibly bullish. in terms of capital, these economies by a large did not have the debt burden that other countries are facing right now. why is that important? these countries are not suffering from a deal leveraging problem. 60%-70% is under the age of 25. in you got there, over 50
% in the west. we were you were 50%, 60% in the south and in the northeast. so we had great strength in many areas but areas like the government, the center region, canada, latin america, we had poor execution. >> now, you do some work -- this is the first time i asked you about this. for the oil and gas industry. what do you guys do for oil and gas? we know what do you for amazon, what you do for retailers and for government. i never heard you talk about this sector. >> oil and gas is a big data problem. we look at massive amounts of data and define patterns so people know where to drill so that's on one hand and then on the other hand it's an integration problem. they have lots of sources of data that need to be integrated and they need to manage their supply chains so we are the infrastructure for that industry. >> so in other words like they get a reservoir map and you figure out what is likelihood of where oil could be found. >> yeah, yeah. we look at massive amounts of data and we find patterns in that data. no different than what i do with my basketball team. who do i sell jerseys do
to build a new airport south of the metropolitan area of chicago. we really are looking at a public/private partnerships. >> airports are the one thing we do in america that people get when it comes to the partnerships. there's always criticism of this, criticism that the governments don't have money, there are criticisms that governments don't make the right decisions. the city of chicago famously struggled with its public/private partnership on its parking meters. in 2008, the city leased its system to a group of private investigators. they did a poor job of managing the transition. there were steep rate hikes and confusion and it resulted in the downgrade of the city's credit rating. i know, governor, that's not your watch, not one of your projects. >> no, that's right. >> what are the lessons of that type of thing for your own initiatives? >> you got to be very careful. you know, the city also did one with the skyway, a bridge across from chicago to indiana. that was done in a better fashion. if it's not carefully done, it can really backfire. so that's why we take each step and
the fiscal cliff is all about. it's about people. not politics. it's about protecting america's future. not repeating the mistakes of the past. with that, i'm proud to introduce my colleague, christi -- kristi noem from south dakota. >> good afternoon. thank all of you for coming. i was having a conversation with my 10-year-old son the other day, talking about lessons i had learn from my grandfather. my grandfather had always taught me that those people you are indebted to, they control you. they control your decisions, your opportunities, and what your future is going to be. right now, the amount of debt our children have sit ogen their heads that they're responsible for for the federal deficit is over $50,000 each. that's going to control them. that's going to control their futures and their decisions that they'll have available to them in the future. that's why the president's plan to raise taxes isn't a solution. because it only covered 8% of our federal deficit. it's not a solution that actually solves the problem that we have. we have got to have a solution that really addresses
called "dear america" popped up online. he calls for the death of american troop serving in iraq. this was not long after the news of the slaying of a south korea hostage. i want to give you an idea of why this has struck such a chord with people. cnn was able to translate the words and they are pretty shocking. the song goes in part, k those f'ing yankees who have been torturing iraqi captives and goes on to say, kill them slowly and painfully as well as their daughters, mothers, daughter-in-laws and father. you can see why this is getting a lot of attention. he apologized on friday and said while it's important to share our opinions, i understand the sacrifices american servicemen and women have made for democracy and freedom in my country and around the world. he also added that the song was part of a deeply emotional reaction to the war in iraq and the killing of two korean school girls that was part of the overall anti-war sentiment shared by others around the world at the time. the school girls were struck and killed by a u.s. military vehicle. psy says he will forever be s
this afternoon will be led by the gentleman from south carolina, mr. wilson. mr. wilson: everyone, including our guests in the gallery, please join in. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker pro tempore: the chair will now entertain requests for one-minute speeches. for what purpose does the gentleman from south carolina rise? mr. wilson: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. wilson: mr. speaker, on sunday the president and house speaker boehner met to discuss the impending fiscal cliff. the next day the president jetted off to michigan to campaign for tax increases instead of staying in washington to work on a possible plan. with a national debt of over $16 trillion, washington's out-of-control spending is placing our national security at risk. clearly spending is a threat with an increase of 93.5% over 10 years and revenues increas
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)